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Second WITCiH Digital Festival Celebrates Women in Tech

The Women in Technology Creative Industries Hub (WITCiH) – a platform which aims to elevate women and non-binary creatives in technology – will be running its second festival 9-11 June, with online performances, panels and presentations.

Published: 28 May 2021 | 12:46 PM Updated: 28 May 2021 | 2:05 PM
Photograph of a person using a laptop working at a table in an office.
Celebrating the unique stories of intergenerational and intercultural women & non-binary creatives in technology. Photo credit: The Gender Spectrum Collection

The Women in Technology Creative Industries Hub (WITCiH) is a platform to elevate women and non-binary creatives in technology. 2021 marks the second festival edition in a virtual format. Taking place 9-11 June, WITCiH celebrates unique stories of intergenerational and intercultural women & non-binary creatives in technology.

Each evening presents a digital premiere of a new commission, followed by intimate conversations with star guests. WITCiH explores the intersection between music, technology, performance art and visual art with strong connections to activism, fashion and the queer scene.

WITCiH brings together vibrant voices in creative tech – avant-garde legends, innovators, pioneering queer icons, psychotherapists, multi disciplinary artists, DJs, label bosses and lecturers to explore diverse perspectives and impart wisdom.

The event will feature star guests Laurie Anderson, Ana Matronic, Nemone,Hannah Peel, Anil Sebastian, Samantha Togni, Portrait XO, Hannah Holland, Kayla Painter, and BISHI. There will also be world premiers of five new artist commissions from Halina Rice, lula.xyz, Hinako Omori, Gnarly and BISHI.

Find out more about the festival and the headliners, and buy your tickets, on the WITCiH website.

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