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Advice for Music Teachers Updated for all of UK

Over the last week we’ve updated our advice for music teachers working in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England to reflect changes to – and clarifications we’ve received on – the Coronavirus restrictions across the UK.

Published: 30 November 2020 | 12:00 AM Updated: 28 April 2021 | 4:31 PM
Photograph of an assortment of percussive instruments set out for use in a classroom.
“We are also pleased that the use of the word ‘extracurricular’ has been dropped in relation to music education.” Photo credit: Shutterstock

We advise teachers to check out our latest advice:

Relief at latest guidance for music teaching in England

As well as updates made to Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland – we welcomed the news last week that music learning would be permitted in person under all three tiers of the new system in England, which begins when lockdown ends on Wednesday 2 December.

Our Education Official Chris Walters commented on the news:

“We are pleased that the Government has allowed all formal education, which includes music learning, to take place in person under the new tiered restrictions.

“We are also pleased that the use of the word ‘extracurricular’ has been dropped in relation to music education. In fact, music learning is often formal because of its links to formal qualifications, graded exams, progression into careers and more.

“We are relieved that the latest Government guidance aligns with the priorities we laid out in our letter to ministers, and we look forward to working with all relevant Government departments as necessary to ensure that music education can continue throughout the pandemic in appropriate and Covid-secure ways.”

Take action now

It remains vital that the UK Government takes steps to protect the musicians who fall through the gaps in their support schemes.

Take action now and join our urgent call to the Government to do more – ask your MP to make your voice heard in Parliament.

You can use our template letter if you’re not sure what to say. Remember to include how you are affected too – personal stories make all the difference.

Write to your MP now.

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