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The REMEL Project: Addressing Race Equality in Live Music

The new REMEL project will use research to address inequalities and create a more transparent, equitable licensing model for live music.

Published: 03 April 2024 | 5:23 PM Updated: 04 April 2024 | 3:18 PM
A black female singer performing live at a music concert.
New research will explore the issues of equality of inclusivity within live music. Image credit: Shutterstock.

The MU is partnering with Black Lives in Music (BliM) to address licensing in live music. This follows the MU writing to the Mayor of London last year to discuss issues of racial profiling. 

MU Works With Black Lives in Music and Mayor’s Office to Address Race Equality in Live Music

Black Lives In Music and The MU wrote to the Mayor last year to raise their concerns about barriers in the industry.

In response, the Mayor, Night Czar, Black Lives In Music, the MU and LIVE established The Race Equality in Music Event Licensing (REMEL) project to take action. 

The REMEL project is chaired by London’s Night Czar, Amy Lamé.

The partnership includes:

New research will explore the experiences of Black, Asian and ethnically diverse music events

In response to repeated concerns from the industry that artists and promoters are disproportionately impacted by police and council licensing decisions, Black Lives in Music has been commissioned to undertake new research.

This research will the impact of policies and interactions with the police, councils, venues and promoters on Black, Asian and ethnically diverse music events.

The research will be used by the REMEL project to develop recommendations and work with all partners including the MPS (as part of their Police Race Action Plan), Councils and the music industry. 

It is vital that all aspects of the music industry are treated equally

A joint statement was issued last week: 

“This research is in response to repeated concerns from the industry that artists and promoters are disproportionately impacted by police and council licensing decisions. The Mayor and Night Czar worked with the Metropolitan Police Service to end Form 696 in 2017. 

“It is vital that all aspects of the music industry are treated equally, and we have been working together over several months with a collective determination to ensure inclusivity to all. 

It will lay the groundwork for a future where the music industry reflects the diversity and richness of the communities it serves.

“This new research will be used by the Race Equality in Music Event Licensing (REMEL) project to develop data-led, evidence-based recommendations to address inequalities and create a more transparent, equitable licensing model for live music.

"We will work with partners, including the Met, councils and the music industry, to take action. It will lay the groundwork for a future where the music industry reflects the diversity and richness of the communities it serves.” 

The statement was made from the below representatives:

  • Charisse Beaumont CEO of Black Lives In Music, Charisse Beaumont 
  • – London’s Night Czar Amy Lamé 
  • – London’s Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime, Sophie Linden 
  • – London’s Deputy Mayor for Communities and Social Justice, Dr Debbie Weekes-Bernard 
  • – MU General Secretary, Naomi Pohl 
  • – CEO of LIVE, Jon Collins 

We hope to see an end to racial profiling in the music industries 

MU General Secretary Naomi Pohl has responded to this new research with the below statement:

The MU welcomes this ongoing dialogue with the GLA and Met Police alongside our music industry partners and thanks both organisations for responding so quickly when the MU and BLiM raised our concerns. 

We hope to see an end to racial profiling in the music industries, and a more transparent and equitable licensing model for live music. We will be supporting all elements of this collaborative work, including the research to better understand the scope of these issues, and work towards data-led, evidence-based solutions.

These improvements could benefit both artists and audiences, as well as breaking down barriers to participating in the live music sector and ultimately contributing towards diversifying the sector.

- Naomi Pohl, MU General Secretary 

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