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Government claims that it has invested more in HE music are partly true – but misleading

Text against image: What they say: Government has invested more in HE music education; The MU view: this is partly true, but misleading

What they say: Government has invested more in HE music education

Example of this claim in use:

  • This quote from an MP in response to a letter from an MU member: “Government has allocated an additional £10 million in funding to arts education, bringing the total contribution to £53 million for the academic year”
  • This article from the DofE

The MU view: partly true, but misleading

Some specialist providers such as conservatoires have been allocated additional funding because they have been identified with particular job shortages, so this claim is partly true.

But with the removal of London weighting and other financial pressures, it is not clear that this amounts to £10 million after other deductions.

Even if £10 million is correct, the proposed cut to other music and arts courses is £19 million. This means that there is still a net loss of £9 million to arts and music subjects, with further cuts threatened in future years.

When the Government talks about supporting arts education at Higher Education, it means a select minority of courses while a majority of courses are cut.

The courses that are most at risk are courses that typically cater for less privileged students, Black, Asian and minority ethnic students, and disabled students – revealing a divisive agenda that is the opposite of “levelling up”.

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Protect Government funding for Higher Education arts and music subjects

Government is imposing a 50% funding cut on residual funding for music and arts subjects at university.

Protect Government funding for Higher Education arts and music subjects